Overtraining Syndrome

Overtraining Syndrome

Overtraining is defined as a long term decrease in performance, this may be a result of training stressors such as inadequate recovery, too much volume in training sessions and non-training stressors such as family and social commitments. Overtraining is commonly known as burnout and or staleness. Return to the athlete’s previous base line of performance may take several weeks to months or even a year.

Fatigue Continuum:

The fatigue continuum is a process showing the steps before overtraining syndrome occurs.

  • Under Training: Not enough stimulus for adequate results.
  • Acute Fatigue: – Positive adaptation with little recovery time.
  • Functional Overreaching: – Optimal adaptations, recovery & performance.
  • Non-Functional Overreaching: – Negative adaptations. Recovery = weeks → months.
  • Overtraining Syndrome: – Maladaptation. Recovery = months → year.
  • Functional Overreaching (FOR): – For an athlete it’s desirable to achieve a FOR state as it is associated with an increase of performance. FOR is commonly used with elite athletes to achieve maximal performance over 1-2 weeks. Recovery from FOR may take up to 2 weeks.
  • Non-Functional Overreaching (NFOR): – This is not a desirable state for an athlete and can be a result of inadequate recovery. NFOR results in a decrease in performance and may need anywhere from 2 – 6 weeks of recovery until restored to baseline performance.
  • Overtraining Syndrome (OTS): – Is the last stage of the fatigue continuum which results in a decrease of performance coupled with disturbances in mood and misalignments that may result in physical injury.
  • This underperformance persists despite a period of recovery lasting weeks or months, which effects mood states as well as performance.

Overtraining Syndrome

Overtraining is defined as a long term decrease in performance, this may be a result of training stressors such as inadequate recovery, too much volume in training sessions and non-training stressors such as family and social commitments. Overtraining is commonly known as burnout and or staleness. Return to the athlete’s previous base line of performance may take several weeks to months or even a year.

Fatigue Continuum:

The fatigue continuum is a process showing the steps before overtraining syndrome occurs.

  • Under Training: Not enough stimulus for adequate results.
  • Acute Fatigue: – Positive adaptation with little recovery time.
  • Functional Overreaching: – Optimal adaptations, recovery & performance.
  • Non-Functional Overreaching: – Negative adaptations. Recovery = weeks → months.
  • Overtraining Syndrome: – Maladaptation. Recovery = months → year.
  • Functional Overreaching (FOR): – For an athlete, it’s desirable to achieve a FOR state as it is associated with an increase of performance. FOR is commonly used with elite athletes to achieve maximal performance over 1-2 weeks. Recovery from FOR may take up to 2 weeks.
  • Non-Functional Overreaching (NFOR): – This is not a desirable state for an athlete and can be a result of inadequate recovery. NFOR results in a decrease in performance and may need anywhere from 2 – 6 weeks of recovery until restored to baseline performance.
  • Overtraining Syndrome (OTS): – Is the last stage of the fatigue continuum which results in a decrease of performance coupled with disturbances in mood and misalignments that may result in physical injury.
  • This underperformance persists despite a period of recovery lasting weeks or months, which affects mood states as well as performance.
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